LINDEN GLEDHILL’S AWARD-WINNING WORK MERGES ART AND SCIENCE IN THE EMERGING ARTISTIC MEDIUM OF FERROFLUID

Always looking for new and creative ways to create art based on natural aesthetics, Linden Gledhill is a biochemist, photographer, inventor, and visual artist who operates on the heady border between art and science. Known for capturing seemingly impossible images using microscopic high-speed photography—often using devices that he invented—British-born Gledhill finds inspiration in nature and seeks to celebrate in his art the intricate beauty of nature.

In an art world dominated by hype, Gledhill is an anachronism—an artist who works at night after completing his day job developing biopharmaceuticals (protein molecules) to treat cancer and diabetes. Gledhill even describes himself as an amateur, motivated simply by his love of creating unforgettable images. Whether capturing the iridescent rainbow of butterfly wings, photographing bees in flight with self-invented high-speed cameras, or visually documenting the intricate shapes of ice crystals as they form, Gledhill’s work is a diverse body always focused on natural processes.

Gledhill has worked with many mediums and has enjoyed accolades from many sources. In 2011, for his work developing a TV commercial for Canon, he was a finalist for a British Arrow Award in the category Best Live Action Special Effects. In 2014, his co-design with Chris Ward for Jon Hopkins’ CD Immunity was named Best Album Artwork by the website The 405

For the music video “Cascades” by UK composer Ryan Teague, Gledhill invented a unique ice crystal-making machine and used his own high-speed microscopic camera for the filming. He also helped invent a motor-controlled marco rail for creating focus-stacked images. He’s even worked as an associate producer for film projects such as the Craig Ward and Lori Precious film The Curse of the Sunset Starlet, starring Sally Kellerman. Gledhill is a versatile artist who only goes where his passion and technical prowess take him.

For Gledhill, working with ferrofluid is a natural progression that offers countless creative possibilities. “I’m completely enchanted by the physical world around me,” he says, “and my career in science has magnified this feeling of awe. I'm always looking to collaborate on interesting, technically difficult projects.”

Linden Gledhill Official Site : http://www.lindengledhill.com

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